• Users Online:1068
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 225-227

Diagnosis of hydatid cyto-biliary disease by intraductal ultrasound (with video)


1 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon
2 Division of GI Surgery; Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon
3 Department of Diagnostic Radiology; Hepato-biliary and Liver transplant Unit, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon
4 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon
5 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine; Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon

Correspondence Address:
Mohamad A Eloubeidi
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine; Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The American University of Beirut School of Medicine, Beirut
Lebanon
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2303-9027.121246

Rights and Permissions

Hydatid disease is one of the relatively common infections in the Middle Eastern countries. It is seen in areas where dogs are used to raise livestock. In humans, the majority of Echinococcus cysts tends to develop in the liver (70%) and is asymptomatic. The two most common complications of hydatid cysts are abscess formation and rupture. Furthermore, in 5-25% of patients, rupture occurs into the biliary tract and patients may present with cholangitis, jaundice, abscess, or bilio-cutaneous fistula after surgery. Intraductal ultrasound (IDUS) is reportedly superior to conventional endoscopic ultrasound for the depiction of bile duct obstruction owing to its additional capability of providing higher resolution images due to the use of higher frequency transducers. Unfortunately IDUS is rarely used, possibly due to the limited availability of appropriate IDUS equipment, cost of the procedure and interventional endoscopists trained in its interpretation. IDUS with wire-guided, thin-caliber, high-frequency probes is a promising imaging modality, yet no previous reports discuss its usefulness in hydatid disease investigation. We hereby present the first report of biliary hydatid disease being diagnosed by IDUS.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1766    
    Printed36    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded271    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal