• Users Online:187
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 

 Table of Contents  
IMAGES AND VIDEOS
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 204-206

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction


Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa, Japan

Date of Submission24-Jun-2016
Date of Acceptance09-Feb-2017
Date of Web Publication24-Aug-2017

Correspondence Address:
Hiroshi Yamauchi
Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0375
Japan
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/eus.eus_19_17

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Yamauchi H, Kida M, Miyazawa S, Okuwaki K, Iwai T, Imaizumi H, Koizumi W. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Endosc Ultrasound 2018;7:204-6

How to cite this URL:
Yamauchi H, Kida M, Miyazawa S, Okuwaki K, Iwai T, Imaizumi H, Koizumi W. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Endosc Ultrasound [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Dec 8];7:204-6. Available from: http://www.eusjournal.com/text.asp?2018/7/3/204/213647

We report a case of a 45-year-old male who underwent a right lobectomy for metastatic liver tumors from colorectal cancer. Nine years after surgery, the patient had obstructive jaundice (total bilirubin - 19.1 mg/dL and direct bilirubin - 14.6 mg/dL). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity mass at the porta hepatis on diffusion-weighted images. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and true fast imaging with steady precession showed that the B2, B3, and B4 segments were displaced [Figure 1]a,[Figure 1]b,[Figure 1]c. A malignant hilar biliary obstruction caused by recurrence of liver metastasis was diagnosed.
Figure 1: (a) A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity mass at the porta hepatis. (b) True fast imaging with steady precession showed a high-intensity mass at the porta hepatis and left lobe of liver had hepatomegaly in compensatory. (c) Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed the B2, B3, and B4 segments were displaced

Click here to view


Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) was performed because the duodenum was deformed due to operation and a duodenoscope could not reach the papilla of Vater. EUS showed the B2 and B3 dilatation and tumor at the porta hepatis [Figure 2]a. At first, the B2 segment was punctured [Figure 2]b and [Figure 2]c because the liver volume of Segment 2 (55% [1089 mL] of total liver volume) was larger than Segment 3 (35% [693 mL]). A self-expanding metal stent ([SEMS] Zilver 635®, 8-mm, 6-French, Cook Medical, Bloomington, USA) was placed in the stricture site [Video 1] and [Figure 2]b and [Figure 2]c. Because there was a high risk of transesophageal and transmediastinal puncture, hepaticogastrostomy (HGS) was not performed.
Figure 2: (a) Endoscopic ultrasound showed the dilation of B2 segment and B3 segment due to the recurrence of liver metastasis at the porta hepatis. (b) The B2 segment was punctured under endoscopic ultrasound guidance, and cholangiography showed a dilation of B2. (c) A self-expanding metal stent was placed in the stricture site

Click here to view



Five days after the first procedure, serum bilirubin level was not enough to improve (total bilirubin - 9.8 mg/dL). EUS showed the dilation of the B3 [Figure 3]a, and the B3 was punctured transgastrically [Figure 3]b. An SEMS was placed in the stricture site of B3 using stent-in-stent technique [Figure 3]c. Because of the transgastric puncture, HGS was performed using a 7-French plastic stent to secure an access route at the time of reintervention [Video 2] and [Figure 4]a. Five days after the second procedure, serum bilirubin level was improved (total bilirubin - 3.2 mg/dL). There were no procedural complications. Stent dysfunction did not occur before the patient died of cancer (during 128 days) [Figure 4]b.
Figure 3: (a) Endoscopic ultrasound showed the dilation of B3 segment due to the recurrence of liver metastasis at the porta hepatis and a SEMS of B2 segment. (b) The B3 segment was punctured under endoscopic ultrasound guidance, and cholangiography showed a dilation of B3. (c) A self-expanding metal stent was placed in the stricture site using stent-in-stent technique

Click here to view
Figure 4: (a) After 3 months of procedures, there was no stent dislocation. (b) After 3 months of procedure, computed tomography showed self-expanding metal stents and no dilation of B2 and B3

Click here to view




  Discussion and Conclusion Top


In patients in whom a transpapillary biliary drainage is difficult, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) will be an effective procedure. However, the PTBD will be difficult to perform for B2 segment and compromise the quality of life of patients, especially in case of multiple PTBD was needed like this patient's condition.

In recent years, EUS-BD has been actively performed, and EUS-guided antegrade-biliary-stenting (EUS-AS) has also been reported to be an effective procedure.[1],[2],[3] Moreover, EUS-HGS combined with AS was reported to safely and effectively avoid adverse events associated with EUS-HGS.[2] Sometimes, EUS-BD is challenging in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. However, EUS-AS using the stent-in-stent technique and HGS may be a useful procedure for the treatment of malignant hilar biliary obstruction (B2 and B3 was displaced) that is difficult to manage by transpapillary procedures.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Nguyen-Tang T, Binmoeller KF, Sanchez-Yague A, et al. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction. Endoscopy 2010;42:232-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ogura T, Masuda D, Imoto A, et al. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy combined with fine-gauge antegrade stenting: A pilot study. Endoscopy 2014;46:416-21.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Dhir V, Artifon EL, Gupta K, et al. Multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided expandable biliary metal stent placement: Choice of access route, direction of stent insertion, and drainage route. Dig Endosc 2014;26:430-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]


This article has been cited by
1 Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Gastroenterostomy: A Promising Alternative to Surgery
Guoxin Wang,Xiang Liu,Sheng Wang,Nan Ge,Jintao Guo,Siyu Sun
Journal of Translational Internal Medicine. 2019; 7(3): 93
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
   Discussion and C...
   References
   Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1583    
    Printed42    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded139    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]