Endoscopic Ultrasound

IMAGES AND VIDEOS
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 204--206

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction


Hiroshi Yamauchi, Mitsuhiro Kida, Shiro Miyazawa, Kosuke Okuwaki, Tomohisa Iwai, Hiroshi Imaizumi, Wasaburo Koizumi 
 Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Hiroshi Yamauchi
Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0375
Japan




How to cite this article:
Yamauchi H, Kida M, Miyazawa S, Okuwaki K, Iwai T, Imaizumi H, Koizumi W. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction.Endosc Ultrasound 2018;7:204-206


How to cite this URL:
Yamauchi H, Kida M, Miyazawa S, Okuwaki K, Iwai T, Imaizumi H, Koizumi W. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided antegrade metal stent placement using the stent-in-stent technique in a patient with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Endosc Ultrasound [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Dec 8 ];7:204-206
Available from: http://www.eusjournal.com/text.asp?2018/7/3/204/213647


Full Text

We report a case of a 45-year-old male who underwent a right lobectomy for metastatic liver tumors from colorectal cancer. Nine years after surgery, the patient had obstructive jaundice (total bilirubin - 19.1 mg/dL and direct bilirubin - 14.6 mg/dL). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity mass at the porta hepatis on diffusion-weighted images. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and true fast imaging with steady precession showed that the B2, B3, and B4 segments were displaced [Figure 1]a,[Figure 1]b,[Figure 1]c. A malignant hilar biliary obstruction caused by recurrence of liver metastasis was diagnosed.{Figure 1}

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) was performed because the duodenum was deformed due to operation and a duodenoscope could not reach the papilla of Vater. EUS showed the B2 and B3 dilatation and tumor at the porta hepatis [Figure 2]a. At first, the B2 segment was punctured [Figure 2]b and [Figure 2]c because the liver volume of Segment 2 (55% [1089 mL] of total liver volume) was larger than Segment 3 (35% [693 mL]). A self-expanding metal stent ([SEMS] Zilver 635®, 8-mm, 6-French, Cook Medical, Bloomington, USA) was placed in the stricture site [Video 1] and [Figure 2]b and [Figure 2]c. Because there was a high risk of transesophageal and transmediastinal puncture, hepaticogastrostomy (HGS) was not performed.{Figure 2}[MULTIMEDIA:1]

Five days after the first procedure, serum bilirubin level was not enough to improve (total bilirubin - 9.8 mg/dL). EUS showed the dilation of the B3 [Figure 3]a, and the B3 was punctured transgastrically [Figure 3]b. An SEMS was placed in the stricture site of B3 using stent-in-stent technique [Figure 3]c. Because of the transgastric puncture, HGS was performed using a 7-French plastic stent to secure an access route at the time of reintervention [Video 2] and [Figure 4]a. Five days after the second procedure, serum bilirubin level was improved (total bilirubin - 3.2 mg/dL). There were no procedural complications. Stent dysfunction did not occur before the patient died of cancer (during 128 days) [Figure 4]b.{Figure 3}{Figure 4}[MULTIMEDIA:2]

 Discussion and Conclusion



In patients in whom a transpapillary biliary drainage is difficult, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) will be an effective procedure. However, the PTBD will be difficult to perform for B2 segment and compromise the quality of life of patients, especially in case of multiple PTBD was needed like this patient's condition.

In recent years, EUS-BD has been actively performed, and EUS-guided antegrade-biliary-stenting (EUS-AS) has also been reported to be an effective procedure.[1],[2],[3] Moreover, EUS-HGS combined with AS was reported to safely and effectively avoid adverse events associated with EUS-HGS.[2] Sometimes, EUS-BD is challenging in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. However, EUS-AS using the stent-in-stent technique and HGS may be a useful procedure for the treatment of malignant hilar biliary obstruction (B2 and B3 was displaced) that is difficult to manage by transpapillary procedures.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Nguyen-Tang T, Binmoeller KF, Sanchez-Yague A, et al. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction. Endoscopy 2010;42:232-6.
2Ogura T, Masuda D, Imoto A, et al. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy combined with fine-gauge antegrade stenting: A pilot study. Endoscopy 2014;46:416-21.
3Dhir V, Artifon EL, Gupta K, et al. Multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided expandable biliary metal stent placement: Choice of access route, direction of stent insertion, and drainage route. Dig Endosc 2014;26:430-5.