Endoscopic Ultrasound

IMAGES AND VIDEOS
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 213--214

Synchronous multiple pancreatic cancers developed long after severe postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis


Ryo Sugiura1, Masaki Kuwatani2, Koji Hirata1, Shin Kato1, Yasuyuki Kawamoto1, Kazumichi Kawakubo1, Tomoko Mitsuhashi3, Toshimichi Asano4, Satoshi Hirano4, Naoya Sakamoto1,  
1 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan
2 Division of Endoscopy, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan
3 Department of Surgical Pathology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan
4 Gastroenterological Surgery II, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Masaki Kuwatani
Division of Endoscopy, Hokkaido University Hospital, North 14, West 5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648
Japan




How to cite this article:
Sugiura R, Kuwatani M, Hirata K, Kato S, Kawamoto Y, Kawakubo K, Mitsuhashi T, Asano T, Hirano S, Sakamoto N. Synchronous multiple pancreatic cancers developed long after severe postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.Endosc Ultrasound 2019;8:213-214


How to cite this URL:
Sugiura R, Kuwatani M, Hirata K, Kato S, Kawamoto Y, Kawakubo K, Mitsuhashi T, Asano T, Hirano S, Sakamoto N. Synchronous multiple pancreatic cancers developed long after severe postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. Endosc Ultrasound [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 18 ];8:213-214
Available from: http://www.eusjournal.com/text.asp?2019/8/3/213/254012


Full Text



A 69-year-old female was referred to our hospital for workup of two pancreatic masses. The patient had no history of alcohol consumption or smoking. One of her brothers had had pancreatic cancer (PC). Six years before consultation, she had undergone endoscopic treatment of choledocholithiasis and had developed severe postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) without a mass in the pancreas [Figure 1]a. Although PEP had improved, a pancreatic mass appeared in the pancreatic body (Pb) 2 months after PEP [Figure 1]b. As the mass remained unchanged for 2 years on computed tomography (CT) images, she was diagnosed with an inflammatory mass based on the clinical course without a pathological examination. Six years after PEP, her serum level of hemoglobin A1c was elevated, and she had left hypochondralgia. CT images revealed two hypodense pancreatic masses: one (35 mm × 27 mm) was in the Pb as described above and the other (23 mm × 18 mm) was in the pancreatic tail [Figure 1]c without lymphadenopathy and metastatic lesions. EUS showed two hypoechoic solid masses and atrophic pancreatic parenchyma between the two masses [Figure 2]a. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies of both the masses with two needles (22- and 25-gauge needles, respectively) [Figure 2]b and [Figure 2]c revealed similar cell nests consisting of adenocarcinomatous cells with hyperchromatic enlarged eccentric nuclei varying in size and amphophilic mucinous cytoplasm [Figure 2]d and [Figure 2]e. We made a definitive diagnosis of synchronous multiple PCs. Since liver metastases appeared waiting for surgery, she underwent palliative chemotherapy.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

Synchronous multiple PCs are extremely rare.[1],[2] There are some possibilities regarding multiple PCs: (1) multifocal cancers; (2) a metastatic PC from another primary one;[3] and (3) a unique-shaped dumbbell-like PC as a whole. Based on the images and pathological findings, we made a definitive diagnosis of synchronous multiple PCs.

Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis is associated with a high risk of PC.[4] The risk is the highest in the first 2 years following acute pancreatitis, although it remains high throughout the follow-up period.[5] Thus, PEP might cause PC. However, it is a limitation of this case that it was difficult to prove the hypothesis based on the specimens from EUS-guided fine-needle biopsies alone.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form, the patient has given her consent for her images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patient understands that her name and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal her identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

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